Atonement in Scripture: Why Trump and Cruz Are the Direct, Logical Result of American Evangelical Theology

Some people might say oh this American, however American Christianity is hugely influential around the world, so this must be looked at and engaged with.

New Humanity Institute

Donald Trump Delivers Convocation At Liberty University LYNCHBURG, VA – JANUARY 18: Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump delivers the convocation at the Vines Center on the campus of Liberty University January 18, 2016 in Lynchburg, Virginia. A billionaire real estate mogul and reality television personality, Trump addressed students and guests at the non-profit, private Christian university that was founded in 1971 by evangelical Southern Baptist televangelist Jerry Falwell. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

Thirst for Retribution

‘How could this happen?’ bemoan some conservative evangelicals.  Titles abound, such as:  The Inexplicable Evangelical Support for Donald Trump.[1]  But the reality is far from inexplicable.  Noam Chomsky weighed in with an argument about economic inequality and working class whites, which I think has lots of validity.[2]  But the argument from economic inequality doesn’t explain everything – after all, why did Southern states refuse Obamacare?  Why don’t more Southerners vote for Bernie Sanders?  We are becoming…

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The one and the many

It’s an ancient conundrum. What do we strive for? The common good or the betterment of the individual? From the ancients till now we’ve been struggling with it.

However what is clear is that today in Britain the individual is the centre of discourse, politics and theology. The common good is quietly being dismantled, evidenced by the shackling of the BBC and the tearing down of the NHS.

I see Socialism as the formalisation of the common good, denigrating the individual.

I see Capitalism as the formalisation of the individual, denigrating the common good.

Both are inherently dehumanising from a Christian perspective. It’s easy to say that God, the Trinity should give us the right balance. Yet, there is much resistance in church to think through stuff. Better an easy answer rather than an embodied struggle to listen to and practice the life, Father, Son and Holy Spirit gives us. Lord, have mercy

A current creed

I believe in God, the Father almighty,
who sits seemingly silent while men shout in his name.

I believe in Jesus Christ, supposedly his Father’s true representative but seemingly so different,
who was conceived by the Holy Spirit,
born of the teenager Mary,
suffered under Pontius, the man who represents all earthly and churchly power,
was crucified, died, and was buried;
he descended to the dead.
On the third day he rose again;
he ascended into heaven,
and he is not here, his absence is painful
and he will hopefully come to make everything good
and he is supposed to be present with the suffering
but I don’t know.

I believe in the Holy Spirit,
the utter rubbishness of the Church,
the broken communion of saints,
the mending of all brokenness,
the resurrection of the body,
and the life everlasting. A wisp of hope.

It sounds like…

When someone tells someone who’s written a piece of music ‘it sounds like…’ then three things are happening…

  1. It’s a compliment. For somehow it reminds the speaker of greatness and therefore is a compliment.
  2. It’s an insult. The musician is seen as copier whose own skill is somehow only aspirational to the ‘great’ that the speaker has alluded to. The musician’s own skill is immaterial.
  3. The speaker isn’t actually listening. Instead of listening to the ‘now’ of sound, the speaker needs to immediately refer to the speaker’s own past, own experience and own opinions rather than listen to the sound and give attention to the one producing the sound.

I’ve been on both sides.